Weekly Roundup - May 7, 2014

Did you miss your Supreme Court news this week? Let our Weekly Roundup help. (To stay on top of the latest Supreme Court happenings, follow ISCOTUS on Twitter.)

Town of Greece v. Galloway

The Supreme Court held that prayer before a town council meeting is constitutional. Professor Christopher Schmidt of IIT Chicago-Kent takes you Behind the Decision of Town of Greece v. Galloway

The Supreme Court ruled that public prayer before town council meetings in Greece, NY does not violate the Establishment Clause. Learn more about the case in our Deep Dive

The Court's opinion in Town of Greece v. Galloway on the Establishment Clause

Tradition! Amy Howe breaks down the legislative prayer decision in Plain English

When religion meets politics, US justices sharpen their pencils (by Joan Biskupic)

Recent Arguments

The last two patent cases of the Term were argued this week. Chicago-Kent Professor David Schwartz explains what they were all about

Interested in delving deeper into the patent cases heard by the Court this week? Get the full story on each from Chicago-Kent intellectual property professors

The audio of every case argued at the Supreme Court this Term is available on Oyez. Listen to cases from the last week of argument

Recent Decisions

Revise and Resubmit—Justice Scalia's mistake (and correction) in his EPA case dissent

Microscope and Telescope: An opinion by Linda Greenhouse

10 big Supreme Court cases awaiting decisions

The Court and the Justices

Last week's verbal spat between Roberts and Sotomayor in Schuette was hardly the first time Justices have made their disputes public

Freedom for the thought of people we like? The New York Times reports on a new study on judicial biases and the First Amendment

Ginsburg on calls for retirement and agreeing to dissent

Sotomayor finds her voice among the Justices

Author Mike Sacks claims the Court will never kill the death penalty, even with the recent botched execution

Lyle Denniston on the Court in the public realm

Justice Stevens goes to the Senate